Picture a Garden
Chantal van Genderen (Amsterdam, NL) on photography, gardens, nature-related arts and design, natural food, sustainability, ecology, permaculture and interesting stuff...

Chantal is curator at the Amsterdam Center of Photography (ACF) http://www.acf-web.nl

(disclaimer: if you happen to find your picture on this site without acknowledgement please let me know and I will add source /or delete content at your will)
Picture a Garden
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ohstarstuff:


Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers and More on Icy Saturn Moon

Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:


Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers and More on Icy Saturn Moon

Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
ohstarstuff:


Cassini Spacecraft Reveals 101 Geysers and More on Icy Saturn Moon

Scientists using mission data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn’s icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon’s underground sea all the way to its surface.Over a period of almost seven years, Cassini’s cameras surveyed the south polar terrain of the small moon, a unique geological basin renowned for its four prominent “tiger stripe” fractures and the geysers of tiny icy particles and water vapor first sighted there nearly 10 years ago. The result of the survey is a map of 101 geysers, each erupting from one of the tiger stripe fractures, and the discovery that individual geysers are coincident with small hot spots. These relationships pointed the way to the geysers’ origin.Thanks to recent analysis of Cassini gravity data, the researchers concluded the only plausible source of the material forming the geysers is the sea now known to exist beneath the ice shell. They also found that narrow pathways through the ice shell can remain open from the sea all the way to the surface, if filled with liquid water.The fact that Enceladus’ sea is salty, laced with organic compounds, spouting into space, and maybe even rising up to the surface has raised this particular Saturnian moon as a major target for future exploration.
Cross-section of Ice Shell (Artist rendering)Credit: NASA JPL
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fuckyeahmineralogy:

Kunzite with Albite; Laghman Province, Afghanistan
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cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
cross-connect:

Ben Butler
Ben Butler received his MFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and his BA from Bowdoin College.  His work has been exhibited in solo shows in New York at Coleman Burke Gallery and Plane Space, as well as at Zg Gallery in Chicago, John Davis Gallery in Husdon, New York, and Davidson Galleries in Seattle, among others.  He is the recipient of a Pollock-Krasner Foundation Individual Artist Grant and numerous fellowships at residency programs including the MacDowell Colony, The Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Ucross Foundation.
He currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee and Quogue, New York, and is an Assistant Professor of Art at Rhodes College.
Posted to Cross-Connect by Andrew
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saatchiart:

Artist of the Day | Violet Frances Cato See more works
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archiemcphee:

Meet two of the tiniest avian members of the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders, a Green-crowned Brilliant hummingbird (Heliodoxa jacula) (top) and a Green Violetear hummingbird (Colibri thalassinus) (bottom). These stunning macro photos provide an remarkably close look at two incredibly small and fast-moving birds - both covered in the itty-bittiest feathers you’ll ever see. They were taken by photographer Chris Morgan in Costa Rica at the Bosque de Paz biological reserve in 2011.

"The hummingbirds were so tempting to photograph to the point of madness! Eventually with patience you get quite close, and I love seeing the details of these little guys," says Morgan.

Head over to Chris Morgan’s Flickr page to check out more of his wonderful photos, including an entire album of beautiful bird photos.
[via Lost At E Minor]
archiemcphee:

Meet two of the tiniest avian members of the Department of Teeny-weeny Wonders, a Green-crowned Brilliant hummingbird (Heliodoxa jacula) (top) and a Green Violetear hummingbird (Colibri thalassinus) (bottom). These stunning macro photos provide an remarkably close look at two incredibly small and fast-moving birds - both covered in the itty-bittiest feathers you’ll ever see. They were taken by photographer Chris Morgan in Costa Rica at the Bosque de Paz biological reserve in 2011.

"The hummingbirds were so tempting to photograph to the point of madness! Eventually with patience you get quite close, and I love seeing the details of these little guys," says Morgan.

Head over to Chris Morgan’s Flickr page to check out more of his wonderful photos, including an entire album of beautiful bird photos.
[via Lost At E Minor]
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le-desir-de-lautre:

Léon Bonvin (French, 1834-1866), Glimpse in a Thicket, 1865, watercolor, iron gall ink and pen, over graphite underdrawing on moderately textured, moderately thick, cream wove paper, 10 1/16 x  8 1/16 in. (25.6 x 20.5 cm).
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zeroing:

Dawnawkaened//Green Hill Zone, 2014
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Jasper de Beijer, Cahutchu #09
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visual-poetry:

by walid elsawi
[via]
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likeafieldmouse:

Paul Schiek - Similar to a Baptism (2007)